lower east side

Dec 04 2011

Angel Orensanz Center, Manhattan

Angel Orensanz Center, Manhattan. Photo 1

The Angel Orensanz Center (originally, Anshe Chesed Synagogue; also formerly known as the Norfolk Street Congregation and Anshe Slonim Synagogue) is located at 172 Norfolk Street (between Stanton Street and East Houston Street) on the Lower East Side of New York City, New York. It is housed in a Gothic Revival synagogue, built in 1849 for Congregation Ansche Chesed (People of Kindness).

Sep 12 2012

Meseritz Sinagogue, Manhattan

Meseritz Sinagogue, Manhattan. Photo 1

Meseritz Shul, AKA Edath Lei'Isroel Ansche Meseritz, is a 1910 Orthodox synagogue on New York city's Lower East Side. It was built by a congregation established in 1888 consisting of immigrants from Międzyrzec Podlaski (Mesritch, Poland). The synagogue is located at 415 East 6th Street. Pesach Ackerman has served as Rabbi since 1969. The synagogue is unusual in being a very small, urban congregation on a narrow lot that has an extremely beautiful neo-classical facade, and is the last operating "tenement synagogue" in New York City's East Village.

May 08 2012

Sixth Street Community Synagogue, Manhattan

Sixth Street Community Synagogue, Manhattan. Photo 1

Founded in 1940, the synagogue originally served a bustling, immigrant population within New York’s Yiddish theater district. The present congregation building is a former St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, located in the Lower East Side, Manhattan, New York City. It was founded in 1846. The church lost most of its congregation in a tragic fire aboard the General Slocum steamship in June 1904. The building stood empty for years afterward until it was brought back to life by a group of Jewish visionaries in November 1940.

Sep 11 2012

St. Augustine's Church, Manhattan

St. Augustine's Church, Manhattan. Photo 1
St. Augustine's Church at 290 Henry Street between Montgomery and Jackson Streets in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, was built in 1827-29 as the All Saints' Free Church, and was constructed out of Manhattan schist. The design – a Georgian structure with Gothic windows – is credited to John Heath, and includes a double pediment and a projecting tower. The church was enlarged in 1848 with the addition of a sanctuary and a chancel.

Apr 26 2011

Stanton Street Synagogue, Manhattan

Stanton Street Synagogue, Manhattan. Image 1

The shul that stands at 180 Stanton Street is the first American home of Congregation Bnai Jacob Anshe Brzezan (“Sons of Jacob, People of Brzezan”). Incorporated in 1893, the community of Jewish immigrants from the town of Brzezan in Southeast Galicia, (formerly Austria-Hungary, then Poland, now the Ukraine), created their place of worship from an existing structure on the site in 1913, within a thriving Lower East Side Jewish community. The shul has since changed with the neighborhood, but has struggled to preserve its old country roots. Today, it is one of the few tenement shuls still left of the 700 congregations recorded in 1918 serving the Jews of the Lower East Side.