harlem


May 20 2011

Abyssinian Baptist Church, Manhattan

Abyssinian Baptist Church, Manhattan. Image 1

The church traces its roots to 1808, when visiting free Ethiopian seamen and allied African American parishioners left the First Baptist Church in the City of New York in protest over being restricted to racially segregated seating. They named their new congregation the Abyssinian Baptist Church after the historic name of Ethiopia. Through the years, Abyssinian Baptist Church moved north on the island of Manhattan, as Harlem became a center of African-American population.


Jun 20 2011

First Corinthian Baptist Church, Manhattan

First Corinthian Baptist Church, Manhattan. Image 1

First Corinthian Baptist Church, Manhattan. Image 2

One of the most ornate structures in Harlem, this church started its life in 1913 as the Regent Theatre, one of the country's early movie palaces. Its elaborately columned and arched facade loosely resembles the Doges' Palace in Venice. The Regent was sold to the church in 1964.


Dec 03 2011

Holy Rosary Church, Manhattan

Holy Rosary Church, Manhattan. Photo 1

The Church of the Holy Rosary is a Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 444 East 119th Street, East Harlem, Manhattan, New York City. The parish was established in 1884 for the for the Germans and the Irish of the newly developed neighborhood. The present church building was dedicated in 1898.

Apr 10 2011

Islamic Cultural Center of New York

Islamic Cultural Center of New York, Manhattan. Image 1

The Islamic Center of New York is a religious and cultural organization established in the early 1960’s and planned as an Islamic institution comprising a Mosque, a school, a library, a lecture hall, a museum, and residence for its Imams.


Apr 16 2011

St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral, Manhattan

The Russian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Nicholas, at 15 East 97th Street, was built in 1902 and soon became an American battleground for conflicts between czarist and Soviet Russians. Now, a decade after the fall of communism and the end of the officially atheistic Soviet state, a new bishop, fresh from Moscow, is planning renovations and modernization.